Welcome to the fifteenth issue of Insights

For more than a decade, the Corden lecture has been an important date in the Faculty's calendar. In the 2013 lecture, John Martin and Michael Förster examined patterns of inequality in OECD countries and possible policy prescriptions to lessen inequality.

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Inside the current issue, Volume 15 | April 2014

Inequality in OECD countries: the facts and policies to curb it
John Martin and Michael Förster
Rising income inequality risks leaving more people behind in an ever-changing world economy.

Do we all want permanent full-time jobs?
Sue Richardson
The standard offering of full-time permanent work is no longer the best fit for many people in the workforce today.

Can employee voice and participation unlock employee engagement?
John Purcell
Active line-management combined with effective top-level consultative arrangements involving senior managers is needed to boost employee engagement.

Performance management: poison, panacea or plain hard work?
Michelle Brown and Martin Nally
Performance management systems can create both positive intended and negative unintended consequences for employees and organisations. Constant attention is needed for these systems to be effective.

The time of our lives
Daniel S. Hamermesh
Why do people worry so much about their incomes and so little about how they spend their time?

Emerging dragons: the rise of the Chinese multinational
Dean Xu
Western companies can perhaps learn from their once students.

Governing the ungovernable: the market, technology and you
Stephen King
Rapid changes in technology have created new opportunities and challenges for competition laws and the regulators and courts that enforce them.

The accounting profession and independence: the scrutiny intensifies
Warren McGregor and Greg Pound
Rapid changes in technology have created new opportunities and challenges for competition laws and the regulators and courts that enforce them.

Audit quality and regulation
W. Robert Knechel
Regulating audit quality will inevitably have unintended consequences.

Occasional Addresses

Be prepared for change
Keith Hancock
The evidence suggests that a general increase in real income, once the most rudimentary needs are satisfied, does disappointingly little for people's sense of wellbeing.

 

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